Posts Tagged ‘Southampton’

April 9th 1988 – Shearer Nets Hat-Trick v Arsenal in First Start

by Richard D J J Bowdery.

A seventeen year-old Alan Shearer made his first start as a professional footballer for Southampton versus Arsenal at The Dell on April 9th 1988. It was to be a day to remember as he scored a hat-trick in a 4-2 victory for The Saints.

But for an oversight on the part of Newcastle United the young Shearer’s shirt may have had black stripes instead of red ones that afternoon.

He could also have avoided a round trip of over 580 miles that took in the south coast of England and East Lancashire.

On Trial

ShearerSouthamptonAs a 15 year-old schoolboy Shearer was given a trial by the St. James Park club and was asked to play in goal. Unsurprisingly, for someone with an eye for scoring rather than preventing goals, he failed to impress the coaches who were monitoring the game. As a mad Magpies fan it must have broken his heart to be turned away from the club he loved.

Shearer later recalled: “I came for a trial with a lot of other lads and there was a shortage or something, so everyone had to take a turn in goal. I was no different from anyone else, I had my 20 minutes just like everyone else, but I said to someone that I’d played in goal for Newcastle when I was on trial and I’ve never heard the last of it.”

To be fair to Newcastle United, they did rectify their mistake later in Alan Shearer’s career but it cost them a lot more than it might otherwise have done.

Despite this rejection the 15 year-old managed to get trials at other clubs including Southampton who signed him up on the spot.

His performance against Arsenal, who were to be crowned Champions at the end of the season, was an indication of what was to come. At 17 years and 240 days Shearer became the youngest scorer of a hat-trick  in top flight history, breaking a 30 year old record held by Jimmy Greaves.

Two weeks prior to his heroics against Arsenal Shearer came on as a sub against Chelsea to make his professional debut at Stamford Bridge in a 1-0 victory.

During his time at the Dell he scored over 40 goals in 158 appearances. Other clubs were beginning to take notice of this young talent and it wasn’t long before a queue of admirers started to form, all eager for his signature.

England Come Calling

Included among these admirers was the late Dave Sexton, then England under-21 coach. In 1990 he brought Shearer into the squad. Shearer repaid Sexton’s faith in him by scoring 13 times in 11 appearances. This goals-to-appearances ratio brought him to the attention of another influential figure: the England manager, Graham Taylor.

Taylor gave him his senior debut against France, in February 1992. Shearer opened the scoring and Gary Lineker added a second as England ran out 2-0 winners.

Shearer’s performance on the international stage caused his stock to rise significantly on the domestic front which caused a lot of additional work for Ian Branfoot, his manager at Southampton.

With the increasing interest in his striker, Branfoot seemed to spend as much time on the telephone fielding calls from other managers looking to sign his Shearer as he did on the training field coaching his squad.

The SAS

Blackburn Rovers' Alan Shearer celebrates with the Carling Premiership trophy

Eventually the inevitable happened and he was prised away from The Dell by Blackburn Rovers who parted with over £3 million in July 1992: helped in no small part by the financing of Blackburn’s benefactor, Jack Walker.

It was at Blackburn that Shearer was to win his only significant piece of domestic silverware: the Premiership trophy.

In that League winning 94/95 season he formed a deadly partnership with Chris Sutton – known as the SAS. Shearer’s 34 goals alongside Sutton’s 15, ensured Walker’s bankrolled Rovers top spot.

His last game for Blackburn came against Wimbledon in April 1996. He signed off with another brace of goals to go alongside 19 other braces and 9 hat-tricks.

In total he scored 130 goals in 171 appearances during his four seasons at the Lancashire club.

But now another team were keen to employ his prolific services and there was the small matter of a European championship with England, in England.

Euro ’96 & The Toon

The Euro 96 tournament was to be the highlight in Shearers international career. He finished the tournament as top-scorer with 5 goals. Unfortunately those goals weren’t enough to take England all the way to the Final.

Once again Germany stood in the way; although if Gascoigne’s legs had been an inch longer, England would have won on the golden-goal rule and avoided the penalty shoot-out. They weren’t and the host nation lost 6-5 on penalties; more than a shade of Italia ‘90.

By the end of his international career Shearer had played 63 times for England and scored 30 goals (almost one every two games).

Football didn’t truly come home in ‘96 but later that summer Shearer did, and so began his love affair with the Toon Army.

With 5 goals at Euro '96 Shearer was top scorer

But if Kevin Keegan, Shearer’s boyhood hero, hadn’t been the gaffer at Newcastle, Shearer could have become a Red Devil.

Manchester United and Newcastle United had agreed a sale price with Blackburn Rovers. Extended talks between Shearer and Alex Ferguson led everyone to believe that Old Trafford was his club of choice and yet…

Legend has it that Keegan asked for and got one final opportunity to talk with Shearer. Whatever was said Shearer put pen to paper, with Keegan looking like the cat that got the cream.

Shearer was reported to have said, on signing for the Magpies in July 1996: “It was the challenge of returning home and wearing the famous black and white shirt which made up my mind.”

The fans who turned out to greet the club’s new signing confirmed that decision. On seeing the 20,000 Newcastle fans who witnessed his official unveiling as a United player he said: “I wouldn’t have got a reception like this anywhere else in the world.”

Newcastle had shelled out a whopping £15 million – a world transfer record to capture a proven goal machine.

In more than 400 appearances Shearer netted over 200 times: more than justifying his price tag.

Of course eleven years earlier he would have cost significantly less; but then hindsight is a wonderful thing.

Injury Brings the Curtain Down

In Shearer’s last season at United he broke Jackie Milburn’s record of 200 goals in a black and white shirt. The record had stood for 49 years and cemented Shearer’s place among the pantheon of Newcastle greats.

At the same time Shearer had a dual role as player/coach. It was a role he had hoped to continue in for at least another season, but a tear to the medial collateral ligament in his left knee, during the League game against Sunderland in April 2006, put paid to that aspiration and effectively ended his playing career.

Although he was never to pull on that famous number 9 shirt in anger ever again, he still went out on a high that afternoon, scoring and seeing his side beat their historical enemy 4-1.

shearerNUFCBy the time he retired from football Alan Shearer had netted 379 goals in 733 appearances on the field of battle. Of those, 260 goals came in 434 Premier League appearances: still a PL record.

Post-Playing Career

Apart from a stint as Newcastle boss towards the end of the 2008/09 season, Shearer didn’t transfer his footballing prowess to the dugout.

Instead he developed a media career as a football pundit. Today he is a regular on Match of the Day, giving viewers the benefit of his experience, gained in over 18 years as a professional footballer.

Although the Toon Army are still able to watch their hero on television, the one image that will lodge long in their memory is of Shearer wheeling away, arm aloft, as he celebrates yet another successful strike on goal.

To relive that incredible debut by the Premier League’s deadliest finisher way back in 1988 click on the photo above.

@RichardBowdery

The Three Amigos –
The Wallace Boys from South London Make History!

by Richard DJJ Bowdery.

The modern game saw history made on October 22nd 1988 when a trio of brothers all featured for the same side in a top flight English match.

The Wallace brothers, Danny and twins Rod and Ray from Lewisham, South London, lined up alongside each other in a Division One game against Sheffield Wednesday at the Dell. Although Wednesday nicked the game by two goals to one Southampton had the last laugh ending the season in 13th place on 45 points, three places above and three points more than the Yorkshire side.

But not only did these siblings compete on the highest domestic stage, each brother also went on to represent their country at Under 21 (and in Rod’s case England B) level; though it was only Danny, the oldest of the three, who made it through to the full England side.

RodWallace

Rod won league titles both North and South of the border

Danny was also the first brother to break ranks when he joined Alex Ferguson’s Manchester United in 1989 and won an FA Cup winners medal in May 1990 when United beat Crystal Palace after a replay.

Two years later Leeds United came calling for the remaining two Wallace brothers, still plying their trade at Southampton.

After Leeds Rod went on to play for Glasgow Rangers, Bolton Wanderers and Gillingham where he ended his playing career in 2004.

Ray’s post Leeds career took him to Swansea, Reading, Stoke and Hull as well as some lower league and non-league sides in England, Scotland and Ireland. His playing days ended at Witton Albion in 2002.

Although he was the oldest age wasn’t the reason why Danny was the first brother to hang up his boots.

It was while playing for Manchester United that he began to experience something that wasn’t quite right though he couldn’t put his finger on it.

He said: “I had a lot of injuries at United. They were just normal, everyday hamstring or calf problems but they were so frequent.”

Soccer - FA Carling Premiership - Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester United - White Hart Lane

Danny during his Old Trafford days

After a loan spell with Millwall he was sold to Birmingham City in 1993.

At City it became obvious that he was far from fit. He recalls getting a lot of pain and numbness in his feet. He had trouble running and eventually even walking was a problem.

Then in 1994 he joined Wycombe Wanderers on a free transfer. It was to be his last club.

Finally in 1996 the reason for his frequent injuries and lack of fitness became apparent when he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Aged 32 he was forced to retire from football.

Today Danny is actively engaged in raising funds for research into MS and in helping others with the condition through the Danny Wallace Foundation.

And though no longer involved in the game he has some great memories from his playing days and one of those must surely be that time in the late 80s when he and his brothers were Southampton’s Three Amigos.

@RichardBowdery

 

Shearer: A Geordie Legend…
…at the second time of asking

 

shearer-new

Shearer broke into the Southampton first team aged just 17

by Richard D J J Bowdery

On 26 March 1988, seventeen year-old Alan Shearer made his professional footballing debut for Southampton at Stamford Bridge against Chelsea.

He was on the winning side as the game finished 1-0 to the Saints; a result which contributed to Chelsea‘s relegation to Division Two at the end of that season.

But for an oversight on the part of Newcastle United the young Shearer’s shirt may have had black stripes instead of red ones that afternoon.

He could also have avoided a round trip of over 580 miles that took in the south coast of England and East Lancashire.

On Trial

As a 15 year-old schoolboy Shearer was given a trial by the St. James Park club and was asked to play in goal. Unsurprisingly, for someone with an eye for scoring rather than preventing goals, he failed to impress the coaches who were monitoring the game. As a mad Magpies fan it must have broken his heart to be turned away from the club he loved.

Shearer later recalled: “I came for a trial with a lot of other lads and there was a shortage or something, so everyone had to take a turn in goal. I was no different from anyone else, I had my 20 minutes just like everyone else, but I said to someone that I’d played in goal for Newcastle when I was on trial and I’ve never heard the last of it.”

To be fair to Newcastle United, they did rectify their mistake later in Alan Shearer’s career but it cost them a lot more than it might otherwise have done.

Despite this rejection the 15 year-old managed to get trials at other clubs including Southampton who signed him up on the spot.

Two weeks after coming on as a sub against Chelsea Shearer made his full debut at The Dell versus Arsenal – and scored a hat-trick in a 4-2 victory. At 17 years and 240 days Shearer became the youngest scorer of a hat-trick  in top flight history, breaking a 30 year old record held by Jimmy Greaves.

During his time at the Dell he scored over 40 goals in 158 appearances. Other clubs were beginning to take notice of this young talent and it wasn’t long before a queue of admirers started to form, all eager for his signature.

England Come Calling

Included among these admirers was the late Dave Sexton, then England under-21 coach. In 1990 he brought Shearer into the squad. Shearer repaid Sexton’s faith in him by scoring 13 times in 11 appearances. This goals-to-appearances ratio brought him to the attention of another influential figure: the England manager, Graham Taylor.

Taylor gave him his senior debut against France, in February 1992. Shearer opened the scoring and Gary Lineker added a second as England ran out 2-0 winners.

Shearer’s performance on the international stage caused his stock to rise significantly on the domestic front which caused a lot of additional work for Ian Branfoot, his manager at Southampton.

With the increasing interest in his striker, Branfoot seemed to spend as much time on the telephone fielding calls from other managers looking to sign his Shearer as he did on the training field coaching his squad.

The SAS

Blackburn Rovers' Alan Shearer celebrates with the Carling Premiership trophy

Shearer found success at Ewood Park

Eventually the inevitable happened and he was prised away from The Dell by Blackburn Rovers who parted with over £3 million in July 1992: helped in no small part by the financing of Blackburn’s benefactor, Jack Walker.

It was at Blackburn that Shearer was to win his only significant piece of domestic silverware: the Premiership trophy.

In that League winning 94/95 season he formed a deadly partnership with Chris Sutton – known as the SAS. Shearer’s 34 goals alongside Sutton’s 15, ensured Walker’s bankrolled Rovers top spot.

His last game for Blackburn came against Wimbledon in April 1996. He signed off with another brace of goals to go alongside 19 other braces and 9 hat-tricks.

In total he scored 130 goals in 171 appearances during his four seasons at the Lancashire club.

But now another team were keen to employ his prolific services and there was the small matter of a European championship with England, in England.

Euro ’96 & The Toon

The Euro 96 tournament was to be the highlight in Shearers international career. He finished the tournament as top-scorer with 5 goals. Unfortunately those goals weren’t enough to take England all the way to the Final.

Once again Germany stood in the way; although if Gascoigne’s legs had been an inch longer, England would have won on the golden-goal rule and avoided the penalty shoot-out. They weren’t and the host nation lost 6-5 on penalties; more than a shade of Italia ‘90.

By the end of his international career Shearer had played 63 times for England and scored 30 goals (almost one every two games).

Football didn’t truly come home in ‘96 but later that summer Shearer did, and so began his love affair with the Toon Army.

With 5 goals at Euro '96 Shearer was top scorer

With 5 goals at Euro ’96 Shearer was top scorer

But if Kevin Keegan, Shearer’s boyhood hero, hadn’t been the gaffer at Newcastle, Shearer could have become a Red Devil.

Manchester United and Newcastle United had agreed a sale price with Blackburn Rovers. Extended talks between Shearer and Alex Ferguson led everyone to believe that Old Trafford was his club of choice and yet…

Legend has it that Keegan asked for and got one final opportunity to talk with Shearer. Whatever was said Shearer put pen to paper, with Keegan looking like the cat that got the cream.

Shearer was reported to have said, on signing for the Magpies in July 1996: “It was the challenge of returning home and wearing the famous black and white shirt which made up my mind.”

The fans who turned out to greet the club’s new signing confirmed that decision. On seeing the 20,000 Newcastle fans who witnessed his official unveiling as a United player he said: “I wouldn’t have got a reception like this anywhere else in the world.”

Newcastle had shelled out a whopping £15 million – a world transfer record to capture a proven goal machine.

In more than 400 appearances Shearer netted over 200 times: more than justifying his price tag.

Of course eleven years earlier he would have cost significantly less; but then hindsight is a wonderful thing.

Injury Brings the Curtain Down

In Shearer’s last season at United he broke Jackie Milburn’s record of 200 goals in a black and white shirt. The record had stood for 49 years and cemented Shearer’s place among the pantheon of Newcastle greats.

At the same time Shearer had a dual role as player/coach. It was a role he had hoped to continue in for at least another season, but a tear to the medial collateral ligament in his left knee, during the League game against Sunderland in April 2006, put paid to that aspiration and effectively ended his playing career.

Although he was never to pull on that famous number 9 shirt in anger ever again, he still went out on a high that afternoon, scoring and seeing his side beat their historical enemy 4-1.

shearerNUFCBy the time he retired from football Alan Shearer had netted 379 goals in 733 appearances on the field of battle. Of those, 260 goals came in 434 Premier League appearances: still a PL record.

Post-Playing Career

Apart from a stint as Newcastle boss towards the end of the 2008/09 season, Shearer didn’t transfer his footballing prowess to the dugout.

Instead he developed a media career as a football pundit. Today he is a regular on Match of the Day, giving viewers the benefit of his experience, gained in over 18 years as a professional footballer.

Although the Toon Army are still able to watch their hero on television, the one image that will lodge long in their memory is of Shearer wheeling away, arm aloft, as he celebrates yet another successful strike on goal.

To relive some of those deadly strikes by the Premier League’s deadliest finisher, click on the photo opposite.

richard@bobbyfc.com

The Three Amigos –The Wallace Brothers Make History

 

by Richard Bowdery.

The modern game saw history made on October 22nd 1988 when a trio of brothers all featured for the same side in a top flight English match.

The Wallace brothers, Danny and twins Rod and Ray from Lewisham, South London, lined up alongside each other in a Division One game against Sheffield Wednesday at the Dell. Although Wednesday nicked the game by two goals to one Southampton had the last laugh ending the season in 13th place on 45 points, three places above and three points more than the Yorkshire side.

But not only did these siblings compete on the highest domestic stage, each brother also went on to represent their country at Under 21 (and in Rod’s case England B) level; though it was only Danny, the oldest of the three, who made it through to the full England side.

RodWallace

Rod won league titles both North and South of the border

Danny was also the first brother to break ranks when he joined Alex Ferguson’s Manchester United in 1989 and won an FA Cup winners medal in May 1990 when United beat Crystal Palace after a replay.

Two years later Leeds United came calling for the remaining two Wallace brothers, still plying their trade at Southampton.

After Leeds Rod went on to play for Glasgow Rangers, Bolton Wanderers and Gillingham where he ended his playing career in 2004.

Ray’s post Leeds career took him to Swansea, Reading, Stoke and Hull as well as some lower league and non-league sides in England, Scotland and Ireland. His playing days ended at Witton Albion in 2002.

Although he was the oldest age wasn’t the reason why Danny was the first brother to hang up his boots.

It was while playing for Manchester United that he began to experience something that wasn’t quite right though he couldn’t put his finger on it.

He said: “I had a lot of injuries at United. They were just normal, everyday hamstring or calf problems but they were so frequent.”

Soccer - FA Carling Premiership - Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester United - White Hart Lane

Danny in his Old Trafford days

After a loan spell with Millwall he was sold to Birmingham City in 1993.

At City it became obvious that he was far from fit. He recalls getting a lot of pain and numbness in his feet. He had trouble running and eventually even walking was a problem.

Then in 1994 he joined Wycombe Wanderers on a free transfer. It was to be his last club.

Finally in 1996 the reason for his frequent injuries and lack of fitness became apparent when he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Aged 32 he was forced to retire from football.

Today Danny is actively engaged in raising funds for research into MS and in helping others with the condition through the Danny Wallace Foundation.

And though no longer involved in the game he has some great memories from his playing days and one of those must surely be that time in the late 80s when he and his brothers were Southampton’s Three Amigos.

 

richard@bobbyfc.com

 

Sir Alf – England’s General

 

Sport. Football. pic: September 1948. Southampton right back Alf Ramsey.

It’s international week and once again England have some make-or-break games to negotiate. So this time we’ve gone with a photo of a man who all England fans owe a debt of gratitude to.

When we think of Sir Alf Ramsey we immediately think of him as the man behind England’s lone international success on the football pitch.

But his legacy stretches back a lot further than that, indeed all the clues were evident in his playing career that this was a man who was very capable of masterminding success from the dugout.

Unlike most images you see of him, our photo of Sir Alf is from his playing days, this one is from 65 years ago when he was at Southampton. Ramsey signed professional forms with The Saints in 1944 and stayed until 1949 before he moved on to Tottenham for £21,000 – a record for a full-back in those days.

At White Hart Lane he established himself as a quality defender who compensated for a lack of genuine pace with excellent positional sense. Ramsey helped the north London club to a Second Division and a First Division title in successive seasons.

Unlike many other players, Ramsey was a keen student of the game and of tactics. His natural leadership (captain of both England and Tottenham) and his influence on the field earned him the nickname of “The General” and he orchestrated Tottenham’s free-kicks in an age where set plays were neither commonplace or considered offensive opportunities.

As with everything, there were lows along with the highs. His regular use of the back-pass to disrupt attacks got him into trouble when, in the FA Cup semi-final of 1951, his stray pass set up Blackpool for a goal that denied Tottenham the opportunity of an early crack at the “Double”.

He also won 32 England caps and was a member of the side that played three games in the 1950 World Cup in Brazil, most famously the 0-1 defeat by the USA, then the most surprising defeat in the whole of football. His England playing career ended on something of a sour note, with his last game being the 3-6 defeat at the hands of a Hungary side featuring Ferenc Puskas at Wembley in 1953.  It was England’s first defeat at the national stadium by a foreign side and there were lasting shockwaves, Ramsey found he was a casualty of those despite scoring one of his country’s goals in that match.  That match had a lasting effect on Ramsey and he was not to forget the movement and passing the “Magnificent Magyars” demonstrated that day.

Champions

After hanging his boots up he began his managerial career with Ipswich Town in 1955. The Tractor Boys were in the third tier and Ramsey used it as a development ground for his style of playing to dramatic effect. In 1961 Ipswich were promoted to the top flight as Champions of division two and Ramsey’s side wasted no time taking the division by storm and winning the Championship at the first attempt, repeating what he had done as a player at Spurs.

Before that season had begun Ipswich had been tipped by all and sundry to be relegated, making their triumph one of the greatest achievements in top flight history.

The way Ramsey lined his side up with a player “in the hole” behind the strikers and with no real wingers was a blueprint for what the Press would christen his “wingless wonders” of 1966.

The FA appointed Ramsey as England manager in 1962. His claim that “England will win the World Cup” under his stewardship seemed like nothing more than misguided bullishness after they were swept aside 5-2 by France in his first competitive game. However, over the following years, Ramsey confidently went about building a team that would fulfill his prophecy.

Ramsey was a firm but fair manager and a master tactician. He also liked to keep his players on their toes, with one player bidding farewell with a “See you next time, Alf” – only to get the response “Will you..?” from the England boss. Ramsey made sure that no player was confident of a place in the final 22 for the World Cup, which resulted in players performing at their highest level. His decision to appoint a young Bobby Moore as captain also showed Ramsey’s ability to see great potential in young players.

Sir Bobby Robson called Sir Alf “the greatest British football manager ever” and, despite the fact that the two men were never close friends, showed his respect for Ramsey by paying for his medical care towards the end of his life.

 

by Karl Hofer

The Saints March Again + Southampton v West Ham preview

By Rob Shepherd.

To Southampton fans it must seem a bit baffling that Rickie Lambert has already had a more prolific England career than Matt Le Tissier and could end up playing at a World Cup finals.

Even if it was a dour draw in Ukraine, Lambert did his bit tirelessly leading the line to push England further down the road to Rio and with two goals in three internationals is putting up a string case to be in Roy Hodgson’s World Cup plans as a new boy at the advanced years of 31.

By that age Le Tissier’s career for one reason or another had passed him by when he was omitted for the 1998 World Cup finals with eight caps and no goals.

Saints fans often argue there was a prejudice against their hero Le Tiss because he remained loyal to their “unfashionable” club down on the South Coast. Such barriers no longer seem to apply.

And of course there was a time when Southampton was a showbiz club of sorts and the centre of the England team when the England captain was a Saint.

soton_KeeganOn 10th February 1980 Lawrie McMenemy called a press conference at the Potters Heron hotel, Ampfield in Hampshire.

‘A new shirt sponsor perhaps?’ pondered the handful of press guys that were hanging around.

When everyone was sitting comfortably McMenemy pulled back a curtain from behind the stage and out walked Kevin Keegan. The reigning European Football of The Year would be joining Southampton from German club SV Hamburg for the significant sum of £440,000.

Even some of the seasoned hacks – many of whom were close to McMenemy and were often give a nod and wink about news – were taken aback with shock. It was hardly the sort of razzmatazz that now comes with signature signings (as former Saint Gareth Bale had at Madrid) but it was more jaw dropping not least because there had been absolutely no hint of the move until the theatrical unveiling.

It had been assumed that if Keegan returned to England a clause would see him go back to Liverpool. But by then Kenny Dalglish had taken over Keegan’s number 7 shirt and Liverpool didn’t want him back.

When McMenemy got wind of the situation he moved swiftly. And that summer Keegan would lead England at the 1980 European Championship and was an injured skipper at the 1982 World Cup finals.

And for a couple of seasons he was the shaggy haired focal point of a swashbuckling Saints team which included former internationals Alan Ball, Mick Channon, Charlie George and Dave Watson. Watching the Saints was a bit like watching a roving England all stars XI.

Keegan’s England career ended in 1982 with 21 goals from 63 games and he moved on to Newcastle.

It’s unlikely Lambert will surpass that but he may yet have a bigger impact than the 20 minutes from the bench Keegan managed at the ’82 World Cup.

And there is a new batch of young Saints knocking on the England door such as Luke Shaw and James Ward–Prowse, with of course ex youth product Theo Walcott a regular.

In Keegan’s day Southampton was a former England veteran club – it’s now becoming something of a feeder club for country. ‘If only back in my day’ Le Tissier might ponder ….

The Odds

Kevin-Nolan-256x300

Extra pressure will be on Nolan to score for West Ham with Carroll out injured

Certainly Lambert’s attacking menace and sky high confidence could give the Saints an edge in Sunday’s televised game against West Ham.

The Hammers have been rocked by an injury to key man Andy Carroll, so added pressure will be on the likes of Kevin Nolan and new recruit Petric to score their goals.

Southampton:  5/6  Draw: 5/2  West Ham: 7/2

Selected Bets:

Correct Score: Southampton 2-1 West Ham : 7/1

First Goalscorer: Kevin Nolan 12/1

Bobby’s Bet of the Day:

Half Time / Full Time:

Southampton / Draw:  13/1

 

Odds courtesy of PaddyPower