Posts Tagged ‘Scotland’

Mackay: A Warrior Remembered
Joe Lovejoy pays tribute to the Scottish legend

by Joe Lovejoy.

dave-mackaySo farewell Dave Mackay. Football has lost a true legend, at a time when the term is used much too loosely, and sadly it’s RIP to my boyhood hero – who once tried to throttle me.

Remember the iconic image of the Spurs and Scotland iron man grabbing Billy Bremner, whose white shorts were in danger of turning brown..? Fast forward a few years and Mackay, as manager of Derby County, did the same to young Lovejoy, then of the “Derby Evening Telegraph”, who he thought was in the rebel camp trying to bring Brian Clough back to the Baseball Ground.

He couldn’t have been more wrong. I disliked “Old Big ‘Ead” as a drunken, egocentric boor whereas Mackay had been my idol since Tottenham’s Double days, when I grew up as an ardent Spurs supporter.

Nevertheless the man rightly renowned as the toughest footballer of his generation was intent on doing me some serious damage that day nearly 40 years ago [“I don’t read your effing paper, but I’m told you want me out”], and he would doubtless have done so but for the timely intervention of his assistant, Des Anderson.

As a player, much is always made of Mackay’s intimidating teak-toughness – maybe too much for it has come to overshadow his considerable footballing ability. George Graham, a big admirer, tells a lovely story from their playing days. In 1960 Scotland faced Hungary in Budapest and in that sepia-tinted era the Hungarians were a match for anyone in Europe. A fortnight earlier they had beaten England 2-0 and it wasn’t that long since they had humbled Billy Wright, Stan Matthews, Tom Finney et al 6-3 and 7-1.

Understandably a young Scottish team were in awe of the “Mighty Magyars” – all the more so as they stood on the touchline before the match and watched Florian Albert run through a stunning repertoire of tricks. It was the Hungarians who introduced the “keepy-uppy” and Albert had also learned from the peerless Ferenc Puskas how to strike the ball hard with so much spin that it would return, boomerang-like, to his feet.

Seeing his teammates mesmerised, Mackay sent for a half-crown, then repeated everything Albert had done, but this time with the coin and fully dressed, with his shoes still on! The spell was broken and a poor Scotland team went out and drew 3-3 [they lost their next two games to Turkey and Wales and conceded nine against England less than a year later.]

George Graham is just one of many well qualified judges who testify to Mackay’s ability to use the ball with the same expertise as he won it.

The bare bones of his CV have had a good airing since his recent passing at the age of 80, but a recap is in order here. A native of Edinburgh, he won the Scottish League and Cup with Hearts before moving south to repeat the feat in one coruscating season with Spurs. Bill Nicholson paid what now seems a laughable £32,000 fee to instal him at the heart of a Lilywhite team of fond memory. It has become a lazy or ill-informed cliche to describe Danny Blanchflower and John White as the brains of that side and Mackay the brawn. In reality, as evidenced earlier, he of the barrel chest could cream it around with the best of them.

That famous confrontation with Bremner occurred at White Hart Lane on the opening day of the 1966-67 season. Word has spread recently that he disliked the celebrated photo that captured it so well because it portrayed him as a bully. I don’t know about that. What I do know is that when he opened a bar in his native Edinburgh a mural of it occupied one wall, above the optics, and when I told him how much I liked it he gave me a key-ring which bore the image.

Warrior

At the age of 33, and after nine years of inspirational service Mackay, not Bill Nick, decided it was time he moved on and he was offered the chance to go back to Hearts as player and assistant manager. He was going, but at the last minute was instead persuaded [by a large signing-on fee] to join the Brian Clough Show at run down Derby, who were then in the wrong half of the old Second Division.

A left leg broken twice [it was Bremner’s kick on it on the day Mackay was making his comeback that provoked their photogenic confrontation] and a fondness of his “dram” had seen that barrel chest head south and the old warrior could no longer rampage like he used to, but Clough insisted he didn’t need to. He would be used not in a midfield role but to marshal the defence as sweeper, behind a 20-year-old centre-half by the name of Roy McFarland.

scotland-dave-mackay-19-panini-1920-1990Clough admitted it was Peter Taylor’s idea, and described how the Rams’ renaissance started thus: “It was at Huddersfield I think. Dave Mackay put his foot on the ball under the most intense pressure in his own six-yard area and then calmly and deliberately played us out of trouble with a pass that immediately switched defence to attack. I remember Peter Taylor’s reaction. Somebody else in the dug-out was yelling: “Kick it, get rid.” Taylor whipped round and shouted: “That’s what we bought him for, that’s what we want him to do – put his foot on it. They’ll all be doing it from now on. We’re on our way.” And we were. Confidence swept from one player to another and the successful Derby era was born.”

The “Rams” were promoted as champions in May 1969 and Mackay’s colossal contribution was recognised when, unprecedented for a Second Division player, he was voted Footballer of the Year, jointly with Manchester City’s Tony Book.

Mackay stayed on, helping to establish Derby in the top division before leaving to move into management, first at Swindon, then at Nottingham Forest. His stay at both was brief and unremarkable but in October 1973 Clough resigned in a fit of pique, believing Derby would beg him to go back but he reckoned without an adversary who was his match when it came to bloody-minded antipathy. Sam Longson was a typical chairman of the old school, a local businessman made good who preferred the parsimony that had made him a millionaire to Clough’s extravagance.

The manager’s spendthrift ways were definitely not to his liking, nor was his outspokenness, and he had tried to sack him once before, only to be outvoted by the other directors. Now, in a tacit reference to the sort of financial shenanigans that later saw Clough named and shamed by the Football Association’s “bungs” investigation, Longson said: “We’ll go into the Second Division with our heads held in the air rather than win the First Division wondering whether the club will be expelled from the Football League.”

He refused to have Clough back, claiming “I could manage this lot”, but this time the misjudgement was his. The players and supporters were outraged and, in danger of a public lynching, Longson could think of only one man who might conceivably be acceptable as a new manager: Dave Mackay. He was wrong. The players delivered a letter, which they had all signed, demanding Clough’s reinstatement, then staged a sit-in at the ground and police were called to disperse the crowd that had gathered outside. Roy McFarland, the captain, phoned Mackay and told him: “Don’t come Dave, we don’t want you. We’re going to force them to bring Brian back.”

Courage

Strangely, having witnessed it at close hand on the pitch, Mackay’s erstwhile teammate underestimated his indomitable courage and strength of character. Nobody was going to tell him what he could and couldn’t do and he took the job, strutting into a dressing room seething with disaffection with typical clenched fist disregard for any opposition. When the players threatened to go on strike he snorted and said: “I’ll field the reserves then.”

dave-mackay-derby-countyTo say he experienced a difficult start is like suggesting George Best wasn’t teetotal. Clough was meeting the players in secret, agitating for a return and it was a rebellious team and crowd that “welcomed” Mackay back after little more than two years away. It was against this mutinous background that Derby failed to win any of their first eight games under new management, and it was hugely to his credit that he engineered enough of a revival for a third place finish.

Clough had left the framework of a good team [they had been champions in 1971-72] and for his second season Mackay fleshed it out with the addition of Bruce Rioch and Francis Lee, who between them scored over 50 goals in 1974-75. In tumultuous times, which saw Clough hired and fired in 44 days by Leeds and Bill Shankly quit Liverpool, Derby won the title by a two points margin, Lee contributing 33 goals in all competitions.

It was Dave’s finest hour. The Clough demons were exorcised, temporarily at least, and the players were happy again – as they are everywhere when they are winning.

As champions Derby were able to recruit from a position of strength and now they signed the supremely gifted Charlie George, from Arsenal – another brilliant addition. When they drew Real Madrid in the European Cup they were given no more than a puncher’s chance, but George responded to the big occasion with a hat-trick in the home leg, a 4-1 win inspiring euphoric scenes on a night I was privileged to witness and can still recall vividly, despite the alcoholic haze in which the night finished.

The Fall

After the pride, the fall. The chink in Mackay’s managerial armour was that while he was an inspirational leader of men and knew a good player when he saw one, he was no tactician. Neither was his No 2, Des Anderson, and instead of having a plan to stymie Real in the return, at the Bernabeu, Derby were told to go out and repeat what they had done at home. They lost 5-1 and were eliminated.

It was not a one-off aberration by management. I remember Mackay’s cavalier approach [“Just go out and play, we’re better than them”] getting embarrassingly exposed on a more mundane occasion, against newly-promoted West Brom. In those days Albion had one outstanding player, Johnny Giles, who could boss any game, given the chance. Most opponents would man-mark him, but Mackay disdained the idea and the Irish playmaker was the man of the match at the Baseball Ground, making both his team’s goals in a 2-2 draw.

Dave was no disciplinarian either and knew that two of his signings, Francis Lee and Rod Thomas, could usually be found propping up the bar at the Midland hotel, opposite the station, after training or playing. Mind you, the boss could only have complained on a do-as-I-say-not-as-I-do basis, having done much the same as a Derby player. As manager, too, there were occasions when I went to the ground in the morning for the “Derby Telegraph” and found him shaving in the gents toilet next to the main entrance. He would sleep in his office after a particularly convivial night out.

There were no complaints about such things in the good times, but recreational behaviour became a stick with which to beat him when results deteriorated, as they soon did.

In defence of their title, Derby finished a disappointing fourth in 1975-76 and a poor start the following season saw Mackay sacked in November 1976 and replaced briefly by his reserve team coach, Colin Murphy.

Sadly, it was a downward spiral after that, undistinguished sojourns at Walsall, Doncaster and Birmingham interspersed with lucrative spells coaching in Kuwait, Egypt and Qatar. But if Dave was bitter at the way his management career petered out you would never have guessed it. He was always good, lively company and I’m glad to say our contratemps in the Baseball Ground corridor was eventually put to bed in May 1986 when, over a glass or seven at Mortons club in London’s West End, all was explained.

Dave and a friend, Jimmy Burton, told me that night that George Graham was about to be named manager of Arsenal. I should have run the story in the “Mail on Sunday”, for whom I was working at the time, but when I phoned David Dein to check it out he said: “Joe, if you print that you are going to look very silly”, and the sports editor wouldn’t publish my “exclusive” without confirmation from the club [how times have changed].

Three days later Arsenal appointed Graham and Mackay concluded he was wasting his breath telling this mug anything!

I’m proud to say we remained friends after that and I will always treasure that key ring.

@Joe_Lovejoy

A former Chief Football Writer for The Sunday Times & The Independent, Joe Lovejoy now covers matches for The Guardian & The Observer and is an author of five books. 

 

 

“Nothing compares to Scotland v England” Alex Montgomery on the next installment of the oldest rivalry

AlexMontgomeryby Alex Montgomery.

It is the intensity of the build-up, the anticipation of facing the Auld Enemy in Glasgow that I have always found so compelling as an obsessive follower of football reared in a football obsessed city.

We were indoctrinated from an early age. When it came to brainwashing the Scottish media were in a league of their own particularly in the austere post war years of my youth. What they wrote, volumes of it, was designed to make us believe that somehow Scotland were all but certainties to win anywhere, anytime and particularly against England.

The approach these days is far more sophisticated based on reality (our natural optimism was knocked into shape by defeats –remember 9-3 and 7-2 – that were national humiliations) though the desire to put one over the Auld Enemy remains. I hanker for the old approach where the only talk in town was the big match, where pubs were packed and much strong drink was consumed without guilt. The City, the Dear Green Place, would then be geared up and ready for action.

There was no chance of a ticket for a boy at Hampden. The alternative was to soak up the pre-match atmosphere; that would do until I was older. My father would even drive me into the city centre on the Friday night before the match to experience the chaos on the streets. It would be spot the Englishman as they toured the bars and restaurants – the Horseshoe Bar and the Rogano Bar and Restaurant (both still serving) being two favourite haunts within walking distance of the Central Railway Station. There would be a few thousand who would travel from England, nowhere near the 30,000 Scots who’d save two bob a week to clog up London every two years. Those who did travel north all looked so big to me, big men in their trench coats with a white rose in their lapel.

EngSco1977

Scots fans enjoy themselves at Wembley in 1977

It was passionate for sure and patriotic without being nationalistic, not back then. The ‘chippy’ Scot, as the English saw him, was ever present but my recollection of these matches in the late fifties and early sixties was of benign antagonism not the vile hatred from a minority we would reel from decades later.

The welcome, because that’s what it was, came disguised behind anti-England chants and risqué songs aimed at England’s finest – Bobby Moore was a prime target but so was Bobby Charlton and Jimmy Greaves and before them Tom Finney and Stanley Matthews and others. Only the very best warranted a song.

For me having spent the past fifty years travelling to report matches in the most passionate football cities in the world, whatever the outcome nothing internationally, but nothing, compares to this the most unique of occasions.

Alex Montgomery is a former Chief Football Writer for The Sun and a leading football writer at many publications over the years including Today and The News of World.

Ireland’s Debt To A Scotsman
Mackay Strike Sends Ireland Through PLUS Lawrenson Stuns Hampden!

by Karl Hofer.

Scotland v Republic of Ireland

Surprisingly, the Republic of Ireland have only played near neighbours Scotland on nine previous occasions.

The first match between the pair didn’t occur until the two countries were drawn in the same qualifying group for the 1962 World Cup. The Scots ran amok in both of those qualifiers, winning 4-1 at Hampden Park and 0-3 in the return at Dalymount Park, with the likes of Pat Crerand, Jim Baxter and Billy McNeill outplaying an Irish side built around former Manchester United midfielder and now RTE pundit Johnny Giles.

The next time Ireland and Scotland met in a competitive match was in the Euro 1988 qualifiers. The Irish, under the direction of new manager Jack Charlton, opened the campaign with a creditable away draw against Belgium. That good work was somewhat undone however when they played the Scots at Lansdowne Road in their next match and had to settle for a scoreless draw.

The next match in the qualifiers was the return tie against the Scots in Hampden Park – and it was a game the Irish could ill afford to lose if they were serious about reaching their first major tournament. Up until then the Irish had a reputation of being poor travelling away from home in competitive matches, but ‘Big Jack’ was quick to change that. He got the team back on track in the group with a one-nil victory in Glasgow, a sixth minute goal from Mark Lawrenson of Liverpool enough to secure the points.

LawroBigJack

Mark Lawrenson is congratulated by his manager Jack Charlton

Although usually a defender, Lawrenson was deployed in midfield by Charlton in an anchor role that allowed the stylish Liam Brady to dictate things in the middle of the park. With injuries to full-backs Jim Beglin and Chris Hughton he bolstered the defence by playing Paul McGrath at right-back to combat the skillful Davie Cooper and Ronnie Whelan at left-back to handle Gordon Strachan. Alongside centre-backs Kevin Moran and Mick McCarthy they put up a barrier that the Scots found too formidable to break down.

In the post-match press conference Charlton nursed a whisky and announced “the character in the team is there to be seen”. Goal-scorer Lawrenson said it could only be viewed as historic if Ireland went on to qualify.

Ireland’s victory in Hampden was the catalyst to their qualification campaign, one that did indeed end with a trip to the Euro ’88 Finals in Germany and some incredible memories. But it is to the Scots that the Irish were ultimately grateful, for without their intervention the Irish would once more be on the outside looking in.

Ireland had finished their campaign and had to wait nervously as Bulgaria took on Scotland in Sofia in the last match of the group. If Bulgaria drew or won it would mean they would go to the Euro ’88 finals and Ireland would suffer yet more heartbreak. Amazingly Scotland, with nothing to play for except pride, scored a late winner in a foggy Sofia courtesy of Hearts legend Gary Mackay who netted his only international goal.

Thanks to a Scotsman Ireland had qualified for it’s first major championship finals.

Scotland full-back Maurice Malpas recalls: “They said Jack Charlton sent Andy Roxburgh a case of champagne. If he did, I never saw a drop of it!”

Sadly Lawrenson, the match winner in Jack Charlton’s first competitive away victory, didn’t make it to Germany for Ireland’s first major tournament, missing out through injury. Later that year he had to quit the game with an achilles problem. You can see his winning goal in the below link;

Scotland v Republic of Ireland
European Championship Qualifier, 18th February 1987
Hampden Park, Att: 45,081

StrachanvIreland

Scotland manager Gordon Strachan in action against Ireland back in 1987

SCOTLAND
Jim Leighton
Ray Stewart
Maurice Malpas
Alan Hansen
Richard Gough
Gordon Strachan
Brian McClair
Pat Nevin
Ally McCoist
Mo Johnston
Davie Cooper

Subs:
Paul McStay for Cooper (46)
Roy Aitken for McCoist (67)

Manager: Andy Roxburgh

REPUBLIC of IRELAND
Pat Bonner
Mark Lawrenson
Kevin Moran
Mick McCarthy
Paul McGrath
Ronnie Whelan
Ray Houghton
Liam Brady
Tony Galvin
Frank Stapleton
John Aldridge

Subs:
John Byrne for Brady (60)

Manager: Jack Charlton

Goals: 0-1, Lawrenson (6)

Sport. Football. European Championship Qualifier. Dublin. 15th October 1986. Republic of Ireland 0 v Scotland 0. Republic of Ireland's Liam Brady moves away from Scotland's Roy Aitken.

Brady and Aitken do battle during the goalless draw at Lansdowne Road in 1986.

 

@KGHof

The Best of Enemies
Classic Scotland v England Encounters of the Past

The oldest rivalry in international football will be renewed on November 18th when Scotland entertain England at Celtic Park.

The two ‘Auld Enemies first met in Partick in November 1872 when the match finished goalless in front of 4,000 fans. What was once an annual fixture has only been played once since the European Championship play-offs in 2000.

However past conflicts provoke debate and stir memories and here STEVE CURRY recalls two of the most memorable, one for fans north of the border, the other recalling a famous victory for England.

ENGLAND 2 SCOTLAND 3

April 15th, 1967 Wembley, European Championship qualifier

EngSco1977

Scottish fans celebrate becoming unofficial World Champions

There was bitter-sweet poignancy for Scottish fans from this victory. They claimed it made them unofficial world champions but it was England who progressed to the European Championship finals in Italyin 1968.

North of the border they had squirmed eight months earlier when Bobby Moore had lifted the World Cup on this hallowed turf but here was their chance to exact some kind of retribution.

The Tartan Army moving south numbered 30,000 and they were to produce a cacophony rarely matched in the long history of the old Wembley.

It was manager Bobby Brown’s first game in charge but at his disposal was some of Britain’s finest talent. John Greig was leading out mystical players…Jim Baxter, Denis Law and Bill Bremner among them.

Anecdote has it that during Brown’s pre-match team talk, Slim Jim Baxter sat in a corner reading the Racing Post. When Brown said: “Anything to add, Jim” he replied “See this England side, they can play nane” At which he stretched his left leg, then his right and said “OK that’s me warmed up”

If that was not exactly true there was some wonderment from my seat at the way the Scots moved the ball like inspired brushstrokes from an artist and it was therefore no shock when Law scored in the 28th minute.

England had been on an unbeaten run of 19 games and this was not in the script by it was the denouement of the game that was to make it the stuff of folklore.

So swaggering was Baxter, so confident of his own ability and that of his team, he began to play keepy-uppy out near the corner flag with Nobby Stiles not more and a yard away.

When Bobby Lennox added a second goal in the 78th minute it triggered a remarkable finale. First Jack Charlton, who had been injured earlier in the game, pulled a goal back in his switched role of centre-forward.

But within two minutes Jim McCalliog had restored Scotland’s lead and Geoff Hurst’s header 60 seconds later came too late for an embarrassed England.

The hordes came spilling onto the pitch carving out lumps of the Wembley turf and wrapping it in newspaper to take home as souvenirs of the day Scotland became UFWC – Unofficial Football World Champions.

ENGLAND 9 SCOTLAND 3

April 15th, 1961 Wembley, Home International Championship

Jimmy Greaves scores England’s third goal in the 9-3 rout of Scotland at Wembley in April 1961 in front of 97,000

Jimmy Greaves scores England’s third goal in the 9-3 rout of Scotland at Wembley in April 1961 in front of 97,000

England were on a roll at the start of the 1960-61 season. They had been told by Walter Winterbottom at the start of the season that the players selected for the first game of the season that that squad would be the basis for the World Cup assault the following year in Chile.

It triggered an avalanche of goals, five against Northern Ireland, nine against Luxembourg, four against Spain and five against Wales going into the the biennial game against Scotland at Wembley.

As Jimmy Armfield, the ever-reliable right-back reflects: “The England v Scotland were ultra competitive. Half our team at Blackpool were Scots and our five-a-sides became so physical the manager had to stop them.”

There was nothing to suggest this latest Wembley meeting would be any different with a Scottish side that boasted Dave Mackay and Billy Bremner, neither a shrinking violet, not to mention Billy McNeill and Davie Wilson.

But then England were bursting with confidence, Jimmy Greaves on fire and Bobby Smith using his weight to some effect. And in mid-field the pairing of Bobby Robson and Johnny Haynes, the skipper, was just as formidable.

Armfield says: “There was little in the way of TV footage in the early Sixties so maybe we remember ourselves as better players than we really were. But if memory serves we were pretty tasty in that match.”

That was the way it seemed in the opening 30 minutes of the game with England careering into a three-goal lead, Robson opening the scoring and Greaves grabbing two in ten minutes

Haynes of the silken pass and first £100 per week pay packet, controlled the game from mid-field with his broad vision and Blackburn’s jinking little winger Bryan Douglas was dribbling his day down the right .

When barrel-chested Mackay pulled a goal back just after half-time and Wilson added a second five minutes later it seemed as if the Scots might have worked their way back into the game.

Step in first Douglas and then Smith to restore England’s nerve and though Patrick Quinn made it 5-3 Haynes took over with two in three minutes. And when Greaves and Smith scored their second goals in the last eight minutes the roiut was complete.

Poor Celtic keeper Frank Haffey was totally shell-shocked, never really recovering from what had been, for him, a nightmare afternoon. The torment lingered on as up in Scotland the gag “What’s the time? Nearly ten past Haffey”

Eventually Haffey decided to get away from it all and emigrated to Australia and eventually went into the entertainment business as a cabaret singer, a far cry from life in post-war Glasgow and well away from his worst nightmare.

by Steve Curry


Scotland Says Goodbye To Sandy
Rangers Legend Loses Battle with Cancer Aged 65

sandyjardine_1823793aby Rob Shepherd.

Sir Alex Ferguson has led tributes to Rangers and Scotland footballer Sandy Jardine, who has died at the age of 65.

The European Cup Winners’ Cup-winning full-back was among the Ibrox side’s most decorated servants and played 38 times for his country.

Jardine – who was also named Scotland’s player of the year at the age of 38 during a stint as joint manager of Hearts – was diagnosed with cancer 18 months ago. He is survived by his wife Shona, children Steven and Nicola as well as several grandchildren.

Sir Alex, a former Rangers team-mate, said: “From Cathy and I, this is some of the worst news we have heard.

“Sandy was a noble and courageous man. The respect he is held in at Rangers is immense.

“He was one of the greatest players ever to wear the jersey. To Shona and family, we express our sympathy and sadness.”

Jardine played more than 600 times for Rangers, winning three league championships, five Scottish Cups and five League Cups. But the finest moment of his career was undoubtedly Rangers’ 1972 Cup Winners’ Cup final victory over Dynamo Moscow in Barcelona.

Jardine made his Scotland debut against Denmark in 1970 and played in all three group matches during the 1974 World Cup finals in West Germany, where he and Celtic’s Danny McGrain were voted the competition’s best full-backs.

He also featured in the 1978 World Cup in Argentina and captained Scotland on nine occasions.

Rangers boss Ally McCoist said: “There have been many great names associated with Rangers Football Club in our 142-year history and Sandy is a Rangers legend in every sense of the word.

“We are all devastated with the news he has passed away. We have lost a great man today.

“I had the privilege of watching Sandy playing for Rangers when I was a young boy, I had enjoyed the pleasure of working with him closely since I returned to the club in 2007 and he was a truly remarkable human being.

“He was respected not only by Rangers fans but also the wider football community and he is a huge loss to the game. We will never see his like again in the modern era.”

Sandy Jardine 1948 - 2014

Sandy Jardine
1948 – 2014

Marvel Moore is England Centurion World Cup Hero Earns 100th Cap v Scotland in Feb 1973

On February 14th 1973 Bobby Moore reached an incredible milestone when he pulled on the England shirt for the 100th time, becoming only the third player to achieve the feat after former captain Billy Wright and Bobby Charlton.

Moore (right) wins his 100th cap as he and Billy Bremner lead the England and Scotland teams out at Hampden Park in 1973

Moore wins his 100th cap as he and Billy Bremner lead the teams out at Hampden Park on Feb 14th 1973

It was an important game for Moore for personal reasons, but fittingly it was also an important one for England as they faced the Auld Enemy Scotland at Hampden Park, a fixture that is never really ‘friendly’ despite the label.

Joining Moore in the England side were two other survivors from the 1966 team; Martin Peters and Alan Ball, but they were overshadowed by some of the newer members of the squad as England inflicted a St Valentine’s Day massacre on the Scots who were swept aside 5-0 – with Moore marshaling the Three Lions defence expertly.

A brace from Allan Clarke, plus strikes from Mick Channon and Martin Chivers plus a Peter Lorimer own goal provided the goals for England in a crushing home defeat for a Scotland team that included the likes of Billy Bremner, Kenny Dalglish and George Graham.

Despite the clean sheet Moore was nearing the end of his reign as England’s main man. Things came to a head three months later in a World Cup qualifier away to Poland when Moore was at fault for both goals in a 2-0 loss.

Moore was dropped by Sir Alf Ramsey for the return game at Wembley which England had to win to qualify for the finals. Famously they could only draw 1-1 and it signalled the end for both Ramsey and Moore. Sir Alf was sacked six months later while Moore made his final appearance for his country in the next match – a friendly against Italy at Wembley. Again England lost, this time 1-0 to a goal scored by the man who would later give David Beckham his 100th cap: Fabio Capello.

When he retired from the international game he held the all-time England cap record with 108 appearances (he has since been overtaken by Peter Shilton on 125), and he equalled Billy Wright’s record of captaining England 90 times.

Two months later he played his last game for West Ham and then left for Fulham where he began to wind down his career before, just as Beckham would 30 years later, he moved to the USA to play where he turned out for San Antonio Thunder and Seattle Sounders.

Like Beckham, Moore was no slouch when it came to commercial opportunities – although this advert featuring Bobby and Tina Moore ‘Looking in at the Local’ lacks the posing-in-your-underwear-to-moody-French-dialogue feel that Beckham has since made his own.

by Karl Hofer.

Tartan Rampage!

How could we focus on the upcoming England v Scotland game without remembering the incredible Tartan Army invasion of Wembley and those infamous images of broken goalposts..?  Estimates are that 70,000 of the 98,000 fans were from North of the Border and looking at this photo you can almost smell the whiskey…

 

England 1 – 2 Scotland

EngSco1977For the travelling Scots it was joy unconfined just before halftime as the thunderous, hairy head of Gordon McQueen rose above all others in the box and powered the ball in for 0-1. Fifteen minutes into the second half, Kenny Dalglish sealed the deal with a goal of sheer willpower. After making a run & seeing his shot blocked, Dalglish forced the ball in for a 0-2 lead. England would score a late penalty in a formality before the real bedlam broke out. In truth it was celebration rather than hooliganism but some of the media went on to report it unfavourably.

The jubilation felt by the 70,000 in the Tartan Army was just too hard to contain, especially considering the last trip to Wembley was a 5-1 win for the ‘Auld Enemy’ two years earlier.

4th June 1977 Wembley Stadium

Attendance    98,103

 Goals:

Gordon McQueen      43     

Kenny Dalglish          59

Mick Channon (pen)  87     

 

Starting lineups:

 England

Ray Clemence

Dave Watson

Mick Mills

Phil Neal

Brian Greenhoff

Emlyn Hughes (captain)

Ray Kennedy

Brian Talbot

Trevor Francis

Stuart Pearson

Mick Channon

 Manager: Don Revie

Scotland

Alan Rough

Tom Forsyth

Danny McGrain

Gordon McQueen

Willie Donachie

Don Masson

Willie Johnston

Asa Hartford

Bruce Rioch (captain)

Kenny Dalglish

Joe Jordan

Manager: Ally MacLeod

Substitutions:

England
Trevor Cherry for Brian Greenhoff   
Dennis Tueart for Ray Kennedy      
Scotland
Lou Macari for Joe Jordan    
Archie Gemmill for Don Masson

The Auldies Were Goodies:
England v Scotland Remembered
Steve Curry

The oldest rivalry in international football will be renewed on August 14th when Scotland visit Wembley as part of the FA’s 150th anniversary calendar.

The two ‘Auld Enemies first met in Partick in November 1872 when the match finished goalless in front of 4,000 fans. What was once an annual fixture has not been played since the European Championship play-offs in 2000.

However past conflicts provoke debate and stir memories and here STEVE CURRY recalls two of the most memorable, one for fans north of the border, the other recalling a famous victory for England.

ENGLAND 2 SCOTLAND 3

April 15th, 1967 Wembley
European Championship qualifier

There was bitter-sweet poignancy for Scottish fans from this victory. They claimed it made them unofficial world champions but it was England who progressed to the European Championship finals in Italyin 1968.

North of the border they had squirmed eight months earlier when Bobby Moore had lifted the World Cup on this hallowed turf but here was their chance to exact some kind of retribution.

The Tartan Army moving south numbered 30,000 and they were to produce a cacophony rarely matched in the long history of the old Wembley.

It was manager Bobby Brown’s first game in charge but at his disposal was some of Britain’s finest talent. John Greig was leading out mystical players…Jim Baxter, Denis Law and Bill Bremner among them.

Anecdote has it that during Brown’s pre-match team talk, Slim Jim Baxter sat in a corner reading the Racing Post. When Brown said: “Anything to add, Jim” he replied “See this England side, they can play nane” At which he stretched his left leg, then his right and said “OK that’s me warmed up”

If that was not exactly true there was some wonderment from my seat at the way the Scots moved the ball like inspired brushstrokes from an artist and it was therefore no shock when Law scored in the 28th minute.

England had been on an unbeaten run of 19 games and this was not in the script by it was the denouement of the game that was to make it the stuff of folklore.

So swaggering was Baxter, so confident of his own ability and that of his team, he began to play keepy-uppy out near the corner flag with Nobby Stiles not more and a yard away.

When Bobby Lennox added a second goal in the 78th minute it triggered a remarkable finale. First Jack Charlton, who had been injured earlier in the game, pulled a goal back in his switched role of centre-forward.

But within two minutes Jim McCalliog had restored Scotland’s lead and Geoff Hurst’s header 60 seconds later came too late for an embarrassed England.

The hordes came spilling onto the pitch carving out lumps of the Wembley turf and wrapping it in newspaper to take home as souvenirs of the day Scotland became UFWC – Unofficial Football World Champions.

ENGLAND 9 SCOTLAND 3

April 15th, 1961 Wembley
Home International Championship

Eng9Sco3

Jimmy Greaves scores England’s third goal in the 9-3 rout of Scotland at Wembley in April 1961 in front of 97,000

England were on a roll at the start of the 1960-61 season. They had been told by Walter Winterbottom at the start of the season that the players selected for the first game of the season that that squad would be the basis

for the World Cup assault the following year in Chile.

It triggered an avalanche of goals, five against Northern Ireland, nine against Luxembourg, four against Spain and five against Wales going into the the biennial game against Scotland at Wembley.

As Jimmy Armfield, the ever-reliable right-back reflects: “The England v Scotland were ultra competitive. Half our team at Blackpool were Scots and our five-a-sides became so physical the manager had to stop them.”

There was nothing to suggest this latest Wembley meeting would be any different with a Scottish side that boasted Dave Mackay and Billy Bremner, neither a shrinking violet, not to mention Billy McNeill and Davie Wilson.

But then England were bursting with confidence, Jimmy Greaves on fire and Bobby Smith using his weight to some effect. And in mid-field the pairing of Bobby Robson and Johnny Haynes, the skipper, was just as formidable.

Armfield says: “There was little in the way of TV footage in the early Sixties so maybe we remember ourselves as better players than we really were. But if memory serves we were pretty tasty in that match.”

That was the way it seemed in the opening 30 minutes of the game with England careering into a three-goal lead, Robson opening the scoring and Greaves grabbing two in ten minutes

Haynes of the silken pass and first £100 per week pay packet, controlled the game from mid-field with his broad vision and Blackburn’s jinking little winger Bryan Douglas was dribbling his day down the right .

When barrel-chested Mackay pulled a goal back just after half-time and Wilson added a second five minutes later it seemed as if the Scots might have worked their way back into the game.

Step in first Douglas and then Smith to restore England’s nerve and though Patrick Quinn made it 5-3 Haynes took over with two in three minutes. And when Greaves and Smith scored their second goals in the last eight minutes the roiut was complete.

Poor Celtic keeper Frank Haffey was totally shell-shocked, never really recovering from what had been, for him, a nightmare afternoon. The torment lingered on as up in Scotland the gag “What’s the time? Nearly ten past Haffey”

Eventually Haffey decided to get away from it all and emigrated to Australia and eventually went into the entertainment business as a cabaret singer, a far cry from life in post-war Glasgow and well away from his worst nightmare.

by Steve Curry