Posts Tagged ‘Everton’

Bilic Back at the Boleyn
Rob Shepherd charts his journey back to Upton Park

by Rob Shepherd.

Bilic the boss.

Bilic the boss.

Slaven Bilic has been West Ham’s manager in waiting not for the past few weeks but for nine years.

Not long after they had bought the club in 2006 the east London club’s previous Icelandic owners opted to sack Alan Pardew just a few months after the club had lost to Liverpool on penalties.

Bilic was in the frame but at the time he had just graduated from managing Croatia’s under-21 team to taking charge of the senior side and with a deep sense of loyalty to his country could not even be tempted to talk.

So Alan Curbishley took the reins. After his unfortunate departure Bilic was again mentioned in dispatches but the former Hammers hierarchy were seduced by the idea Gianfranco Zola could sprinkle stardust.

After David Gold and David Sullivan rescued the club from going to the wall and concluded that Zola the manager was never going to be Zola the player, Bilic was in the frame again but they opted for what they thought were the safe hands of Avram Grant.

When it came to replacing Grant after relegation, Bilic was still entrenched with the Croatia national team and also felt he needed more miles on the clock in club football before taking a big job in the Premier League or Bundesliga.

Those miles have been stacked up with a rough time at Lokomotiv Moscow and successful stint with Besiktas in Turkey.

So when he quit Besiktas last month it seemed he a was shoo-in to take over from Sam Allardyce.

Indeed there is little doubt Bilic would have been sounded-out by third parties some months ago when it was clear the Allardyce era would be over this summer.

But in football always beware the phrase ‘done deal’ and the machinations of myriads of agents trying to hustle a move or a new deal for their client.

Suddenly managers with better CV’s than Bilic’s were either available or being touted around.

Jurgen Klopp, Rafa Benitez, Frank de Boer, Marcelo Bielsa, Unai Emery… all seemed better than Bilic when it came to ‘going foreign’.

Then there were the cases for the young bright English managers such as Eddie Howe and Gary Monk. Or David Moyes. The idea of bringing Harry Redknapp back was even discussed.

The over riding factor was: Which manager would make sure the team stays in the Premier League for their move to the Olympic Stadium in 2017..?

Bilic was a big hit at West Ham

Bilic was a big hit at West Ham

For the past month or so David Sullivan has agonized with all the options and attempted to get full approval of co-owner David Gold and vice-chairman Karren Brady.

It has not been easy to task.

Benitez was the one they thought ticked most of the boxes but when Real Madrid came calling then a decision between the Bernebau and the Bolyen was an obvious one for the Spaniard.

Moyes made it clear he would carry on rebuilding his career at Real Socidead and didn’t fancy stepping into the shoes of his pal Big Sam.

Then as the process spun out there became a nagging feeling that maybe some of those on the ‘long list’, or at least their advisors, were using West Ham’s situation as a way of filling their boots with new contracts at their existing clubs.

All the while Bilic remained an option despite reservations that he had not managed a club in one of the ‘big leagues’.

Bilic could easily have taken umbridge that the club was on a recruitment carousel and jumped off.

Instead he sealed himself off holidaying with his family back near his home in Split. He refused to comment publicly or even take calls. He just viewed the situation phlegmatically.

Why wouldn’t a club making such a big decision go through their options..?

And as they did the realization set in that no one could possibly tick all the boxes and that Bilic ticked most. He also wanted the job, not just the money.

He knows the English scene, he is tactically astute if not innovative, and most of all he is a strong commanding character that gets players playing for him and the cause.

And Bilic is big on causes – as I first found out not long after Redknapp signed him from German club Karlsruhe in 1996.

Redknapp signed Bilic from German side Karlsruhe

Redknapp signed Bilic from German side Karlsruhe

I had arranged to do an interview with Bilic at West Ham’s Chadwell Heath training ground. But Bilic didn’t want to do it there. He wanted more relaxed surrounds and wanted to find out what an old fashioned ‘normal’ British pub was like.

So I took him a few miles down the road to the Moby Dick just off the A12.

I walked in and asked him what he wanted: “A pint of milk,” he replied.

“Pardon ?”

“Oh I don’t drink. I just wanted to see what a pub looks like.”

He didn’t drink but boy did he smoke back then. In the hour or so we chatted he puffed his way through half a pack of Marlboro Red!

As he did so his passion for a cause became clear as he discussed his fierce patriotism for Croatia at a time when the bitter turmoil of civil war as a consequence of the break-up of Yugoslavia was still a recent painful memory.

Bilic took his passion on to the pitch for the Hammers and a year later when Everton agreed to sign him in March (the days before the transfer window) he insisted he stay on and play for West Ham until they pulled themselves away from relegation battle.

When he moved into management with his home town club of Hadjuk Split after his career was cut short by injury there always seemed a sense of destiny that Bilic would one day return to West Ham as manager.

It has been a long time coming, and the process in recent weeks was starting to become exhausting, but in the end the Hammers have a new manager who will not only promote more expansive football but will demand the players perform with pride and passion or in other words restore the “West Ham” way.

@Shep_62

January 1984: Inchy’s League Cup Leveller Saves Kendall From The Chop!

by Richard D J J Bowdery.

efc__1286464179_heath_signing

Heath became Everton’s record signing when he signed for £700,000 from Stoke in January 1982

With only six wins from 21 League appearances the natives of Goodison Park were growing increasingly restless. There were vociferous calls for the manager’s head on a platter.

To cap it all his First Division side were facing a banana-skin match: a League Cup quarter final tie against Third Division Oxford United.

It only made matters worse when his side went 1-0 down during the match before Adrian Heath stepped up to level the score and draw the game at one apiece.

Everton went on to win the replay 4-1 and made it all the way to the Wembley Final only to lose in a replay 1-0 to arch-rivals Liverpool.

But a corner had been turned on the 18 January 1984 with Heath’s equaliser and it’s such results that define a manager’s career – you only have to look at Mark Robbins famous winning goal for Manchester United in an FA Cup tie against Nottingham Forest to realise that. It was that cup win which saved Alex Ferguson’s United career according to perceived wisdom at the time. And we all know what he went on to achieve…

While some among the Everton faithful still wanted ‘blood’ the board stayed faithful to their man at the helm.

It was a wise decision on their part as it as it turned out. And Howard Kendall rewarded their faith with the most successful period ever in the Toffee’s history.

When Everton FC were looking for their Manager of the Millennium in 2000 they had over a dozen candidates to choose from. The Millennium Giants panel whittled it down to two: Harry Catterick and Kendal.

But even the legendary Catterick couldn’t compete with a manager whose success included:

• Two League Championships – 1984/85 and 1986/87
• FA Cup winner – 1984 (runners-up in 1985 and 1986)
• Charity Shield winners – 1984, 1985, 1986 (shared) and 1987
• European Cup Winners Cup winner – 1985
• Manager of the Year – 1985 and 1987.

So it was Kendall, appointed player/manager in 1981, who was bestowed with the honour of being Everton’s Manager of the Millennium.

HowardKendall

Kendall is his playing days

He left in 1987 to manage Spanish club Athletic Bilbao, largely because of the ban on English clubs competing in European competitions, but returned for two further spells with Everton in 1990-93 and 1997-98.

During these latter periods, however, he couldn’t rustle up that Midas touch he had once displayed. Even the 1991 Zenith Data Systems Cup eluded him when his side lost4-1 in the final to Crystal Palace.

Although his managerial reign at Everton ended in a whimper it has done nothing to taint the glory years from 1981 to 87 when Everton FC really did reach the dizzy heights of English and European league and cup success.

But there is still one question I have that remains unanswered: did Howard Kendall ever buy Adrian Heath a large drink for that goal he scored on 18 January 1984..?

@RichardBowdery

40 Years On: British Transfer Record Broken As Latchford Joins Everton

Bob-Latchford-Everton1-310x415

‘The Latch’

by Karl Hofer.

With the arrival of Angel Di Maria at Old Trafford for a British Transfer record of £59.7million, BOBBY rolls back time to 40 years ago when Everton brought in Bob Latchford from Birmingham City for a then record fee of £350,000.

Everton have been blessed with some great number nines through the years – the likes of Dixie Dean, Joe Royle and Dave Hickson to name but three – but for Toffees fans Bob Latchford has a special place in their history and their hearts. After all, according to the famous Everton terrace chant, Bob Latchford could walk on water!

It’s been 40 years since The Latch signed for the Blues, moving from Birmingham City in a £350,000 British transfer record deal that saw another Goodison legend, Howard Kendall, go in the opposite direction, along with Archie Styles.

At Everton, Latchford was the top scorer for six successive seasons. Whilst Latchford would not get his hands on any winners medals during his time at Goodison, his heart and his goals gave Everton fans something to smile about during the mid-to-late 1970s, finding the back of the net 138 times in 289 appearances.

He had some memorable strikes as well, including a diving header (a speciality of The Latch) in a FA Cup semi-final replay against West Ham at Elland Road in 1980 (the Hammers won in extra time) and the winning goal at Bolton which took Everton to the 1977 League Cup final to play Aston Villa.

Latchford bagged a last-minute leveller in the first replay against Villa at Hillsborough, before netting the opening goal in the second replay at Old Trafford (it was the only domestic final to go to two replays).

Villa came back to make it 2-2 at the end of normal time and then won the cup in extra time, leaving Latchford and Everton empty handed once more despite the heroics.

Whilst medals eluded Latchford during his seven years at Goodison he did land a £10,000 prize from the Daily Express for bagging 30 goals in the 1977/78 campaign. The paper put up the money for anyone who could reach 30 league goals – a feat that had last been achieved by Francis Lee seven years previously.

The Latch went into Everton’s final game of the season at a packed Goodison Park needing two goals to reach the magical figure of 30 goals. Chelsea were the visitors and there was little they could do to stop the Toffees that day, they were swept aside in a 6-0 drubbing – with Latchford bagging the fourth and final goals to pocket the £10,000.

Latchford_30

Latchford celebrates after scoring his 30th goal of the season

Not that he got to enjoy his winnings. In fact, by the time he’d generously donated a sum to the PFA benevolence fund and shared out the rest among team-mates and club staff, he was left with just £192. He still jokes about having to convince the taxman he didn’t actually owe anything.

Everton fell away sharply, from title contenders in 78/79 to a 19th placed finish in 79/80, and another poor finish of 15th a year later, coupled with the continuing success being enjoyed by Everton’s neighbours across the city, led to  Gordon Lee’s departure as manager.

That signalled the end for Latchford at Goodison, as in an ironic final twist Latchford was sold to Swansea City by incoming boss Howard Kendall – the very man who had been shipped out to Birmingham when the Latch signed for Everton in 1974.

Latchford netted a hat-trick on his debut for the Swans and went on to spearhead their rise through the divisions, before spells with NAC Breda in Holland, Coventry, Lincoln and Newport County.

He also represented England twelve times, scoring on five occasions.

But, at heart, he was always a blue.

“I might have started at Birmingham,” Latchford once said, “but my soul is at Goodison.”

 

Merseyside Parades the World Cup Trophy! Plus the League Championship and the FA Cup…

Roger Hunt of Liverpool and Ray Wilson of Everton show off the Jules Rimet trophy in 1966

Our latest Great Shot naturally had to have a World Cup theme, so we dug up this one from August 13th 1966. The Charity Shield saw Everton play Liverpool at Goodison Park. This Merseyside derby followed England’s World Cup success and was a pre-match silverware walk.

Liverpool walked the League Championship trophy around Goodison (which must have been quite weird), and then Everton walked the FA Cup around the ground before England heroes Roger Hunt of Liverpool and Ray Wilson of Everton carried the Jules Rimet trophy jointly – in what must be the most silverware-laiden lap of honour ever seen in British football.

Liverpool went on to win the match 1-0 with a goal from Hunt in front of 63,329.

Charity Shield, Goodison Park, Aug 13th 1966 – Teams;

Liverpool: T Lawrence, C Lawler, G Byrne, T Smith, R Yeats, W Stevenson, I Callaghan, R Hunt, I St John, G Strong, P Thompson.

Everton: G West, T Wright, R Wilson, J Gabriel, B Labone, G Glover, A Scott, A Young, M Trebilcock, J Harvey, D Temple.

 

 

“I’m a Substitute for Another Guy”
WHO were the first substitutes to appear and score in a Cup Final?

by Richard Bowdery.

Today the use of substitutes is an integral part football and the FA Cup is no exception. Yet it wasn’t all that long ago when if you weren’t in the team on Cup Final day, you would have no chance of playing in the end of season showpiece.

First ever substitute

Dennis Clarke

Dennis Clarke

That changed in the 1968 Final played on 18 May when West Bromwich Albion faced Everton at Wembley.

The only goal of the game was scored by West Brom’s Jeff Astle in the first period of extra time which forever etched him into Baggies folklore.

But the real history making event occurred when West Brom defender Dennis Clarke came on to replace the injured John Kaye. He was the first substitute to be used in an FA Cup Final.

And you have to go almost as far back to find the first substitute to score in a Final.

First scoring substitute
On a barmy day in May 1971 Arsenal lined up against Liverpool. A win would complete a dramatic double – League and FA Cup winners – for the Gunners, the first club to achieve it since Spurs a decade earlier.

Arsenal fell behind to a Steve Heighway opener for Liverpool in extra time. But parity was restored when Arsenal substitute, Eddie Kelly, steered a George Graham shot across the line in the 101st minute.

Charlie George fired the winner past a despairing Ray Clemence. George’s siesta after scoring will be forever remembered by the Gooners at Wembley and those watching the match on TV.

Quiz organisers
If you organise quiz competitions and are stuck for a decent footballing question, this information on Cup Final substitutes should provide the answer.

Until next time
This column is taking a well-deserved rest and will be back at the start of next season (although it may feature during the World Cup next month).

So, with apologies to the late, great Brian Moore, “Goodbye and thank you for reading.”

See you next season!

richard@bobbyfc.com

FA Cup: BOBBY Sensing Scouse Success

Everton-v-West-Brom-Roberto-Martinez_2992704

Martinez will face one of his former sides as Everton entertain Swansea

The FA Cup has received a huge shot in the arm given the draw the for the fifth round, which means at least two super powers will be knocked out.

The two diamond draws see Manchester City play Chelsea while Arsenal are at home to Liverpool.

There is a twist of romance with Everton boss Roberto Martinez facing one of his former clubs, Swansea.

Martinez of course won the competition with Wigan last season. And Everton, who were a clever money shot at the start of the tournament at 10-1 and a BOBBY’S BETS tip to go all the way, are now 6-1 third favourites behind Man City (10/3) and Arsenal (9/2) according to Coral.

There is still value to get on Everton now.

But given the schedule Arsenal face, Liverpool could well win at the Emirates so 6-1 on them right now is worth a punt.

The Gunners are now scheduled to play Liverpool and Manchester United in the league, Liverpool again in the FA Cup and Bayern Munich in the Champions League in the space of 12 days.

Second-placed Manchester City’s game with Chelsea, who are third, will take place either within four days of hosting Barcelona in the Champions League.

Given Sunderland’s relegation worries and the fact they have made the Capital One Cup final, Southampton look a good bet to win at the Stadium of Light and are 10-1 to lift the Cup.

Draw for the Fifth Round :

Manchester City v Chelsea
Sheffield United v Nottingham Forest
Arsenal v Liverpool
Brighton & Hove Albion v Hull City
Cardiff City v Wigan Athletic
Sheffield Wednesday v Charlton Athletic
Sunderland v Southampton
Everton v Swansea City

The games will be played on the weekend of 15-16 February

 

MNF: West Brom v Everton
Preview & Odds PLUS ’68 Cup Final Memories

West Bromich Albion v Everton, Premier League, Monday 20th January, 8pm. Live on SkySports1

THE ODDS

WBA:   23/10   DRAW:  23/10    EVERTON:   5/4

HEAD TO HEAD RECORD:

WBA wins: 58   Draws:  35   Everton wins: 65

Selected Bets:

Both Teams to Score:   YES:  4/6   NO:   11/10

Everton to come from behind and win:  10/1

West Brom to win:  1-0:  9/1, 2-0: 17/1,  2-1: 10/1,  3-1: 25/1, 3-2: 30/1

Draw:  0-0: 9/1, 1-1: 11/2, 2-2: 12/1, 3-3: 50/1

Everton to win:  1-0:  7/1, 2-0: 10/1, 2-1: 8/1, 3-1: 16/1, 3-2: 25/1

First Goalscorer: Lukaku: 9/2, Anelka: 7/1, Mirallas: 7/1, Baines: 12/1

BOBBY’S BET OF THE DAY – Anytime Goalscorer; Baines: 4/1

Odds courtesy of PaddyPower

Jeff-Astle-and-Bobby-Hope-001

Jeff Astle and Bobby Hope hold the cup aloft in 1968

Astle’s Finest Hour

Perhaps it wasn’t the greatest of matches, but the 1968 Cup Final was a remarkable one for a number of reasons;

*The 1968 Cup final was the first final to be televised live in colour.

*West Brom won with a Jeff Astle goal three minutes into extra time. The goal meant that Astle had scored in every round of that season’s competition.

*Dennis Clarke became the first substitute to be used in an FA Cup final when he came on for West Bromwich Albion.

*Both teams wore away strips, Everton wearing bright amber shirts and blue shorts and West Bromwich Albion in white shirts and shorts with red socks.

This was Albion’s tenth final and they won the cup for the fifth time and in doing so qualified for the 1968–69 European Cup Winners’ Cup. They haven’t appeared in a final since.

Did You Know: Legend has it that on the evening of the 1968 FA Cup Final triumph the words “ASTLE IS THE KING” appeared in large white letters on the brickwork of Primrose Bridge in the heart of the Black Country. The bridge quickly became known locally as “the Astle Bridge”. When the council removed the letters, they re-appeared a few days later.

A campaign was launched to have the bridge officially named in his honour following Astle’s death in 2002, but this has so far been rejected over fears of vandal attacks by supporters of rival teams, as the area also has a high percentage of Aston Villa and Wolves fans.

FA Cup Final, Wembley Stadium, May 18th, 1968

EVERTON: Gordon West, Ray Wilson, Brian Labone, Tommy Wright, John Hurst, Alan Ball, Colin Harvey, Howard Kendall, John Morrissey, Joe Royle, Jimmy Husband

WBA: John Osborne, Doug Fraser, Graham Williams, Tony Brown, John Talbut, John Kaye, Graham Lovett, Ian Collard, Jeff Astle, Bobby Hope, Clive Clark

Att: 99,665

 

 

He Was For The Chop – But Served Up Cordon Blue Cuisine Instead!

howard-kendall-celebrates-with-his-team-after-clinching-the-1985-title-against-qpr-at-goodison-256372330-3258259

Howard Kendall celebrates with his team after clinching the 1985 title against QPR.

by Richard D J J Bowdery.

With only six wins from 21 League appearances the natives of Goodison Park were growing increasingly restless. There were vociferous calls for the manager’s head on a platter.

To cap it all his First Division side were facing a banana-skin match: a League Cup quarter final tie against Third Division Oxford United.

It only made matters worse when his side went 1-0 down during the match before Adrian Heath stepped up to level the score and draw the game at one apiece.

Everton went on to win the replay 4-1 and made it all the way to the Wembley Final only to lose in a replay 1-0 to arch-rivals Liverpool.

But a corner had been turned on the 18 January 1984 with Heath’s equaliser and it’s such results that define a manager’s career – you only have to look at Mark Robbins winning goal for Manchester United in an FA Cup tie against Nottingham Forest to realise that. It was that cup win which saved Alex Ferguson’s United career according to perceived wisdom at the time. And we all know what he went on to achieve.

efc__1286464179_heath_signing

Heath became Everton’s record signing when he signed for £700,000 from Stoke in January 1982

While some among the Everton faithful still wanted ‘blood’ the board stayed faithful to their man at the helm.

It was a wise decision on their part as it as it turned out. And Howard Kendall rewarded their faith with the most successful period ever in the Toffee’s history.

When Everton FC were looking for their Manager of the Millennium in 2000 they had over a dozen candidates to choose from. The Millennium Giants panel whittled it down to two: Harry Catterick and Kendal.

But even the legendary Catterick couldn’t compete with a manager whose success included:

• Two League Championships – 1984/85 and 1986/87
• FA Cup winner – 1984 (runners-up in 1985 and 1986)
• Charity Shield winners – 1984, 1985, 1986 (shared) and 1987
• European Cup Winners Cup winner – 1985
• Manager of the Year – 1985 and 1987.

So it was Kendall, appointed player/manager in 1981, who was bestowed with the honour of being Everton’s Manager of the Millennium.

HowardKendall

Kendall, in his playing days.

He left in 1987 to manage Spanish club Athletic Bilbao, largely because of the ban on English clubs competing in European competitions, but returned for two further spells with Everton in 1990-93 and 1997-98.

During these latter periods, however, he couldn’t rustle up that Midas touch he had once displayed. Even the 1991 Zenith Data Systems Cup eluded him when his side lost4-1 in the final to Crystal Palace.

Although his managerial reign at Everton ended in a whimper it has done nothing to taint the glory years from 1981 to 87 when Everton FC really did reach the dizzy heights of English and European league and cup success.

But there is still one question I have that remains unanswered: did Howard Kendall ever buy Adrian Heath a large drink for that goal he scored on 18 January 1984?

If you would like to comment on this column email richard@bobbyfc.com.

Cup Half Full..? + 2014 Odds
Will the Country Ever Rekindle it’s Love for the FA Cup..?

by Karl Hofer.

It has had it’s issues of late, but the FA Cup is still the world’s oldest football knockout competition,  and its role in the history of the beautiful game is unprecedented.

The FA Cup Final has been an indelible part of English national consciousness for over a century. Since the dawn of the television era the entire nation (and many other countries around the world) have been transfixed by the great spectacle from North London.

The whole of FA Cup Final Saturday would build up to 3 pm. Both ITV and the BBC would begin their coverage earlier and earlier each year to milk the viewers, sometimes as early as 8am!

The final itself generated so much excitement; we can all recall the TV crew on the bus to the stadium from the hotel, the players walking round the pitch in their specially tailored suits for the day, the crowd singing ‘abide with me’ – and teams would always release a single during the build up.

Not anymore though. With the incredible amount of live football on TV nowadays such romance and sentiment is unlikely to ever return, which is a shame. Be careful what you wish for as they say…

Regardless, the FA Cup has also produced some amazing memories and some fantastic games over the years, too many to reminisce about here. But before we look at the odds to win the 2014 competition lets remember three finals whose anniversaries are this year;

25 Years Ago: Everton 2-3 Liverpool

What a final, a Merseyside derby no less. The final was played only five weeks after the Hillsborough disaster and before kick-off there was an impeccably observed minute’s silence while the teams wore black armbands as a sign of respect. Gerry Marsden, lead singer of Gerry & the Pacemakers, led the crowd in an emotional rendition of You’ll Never Walk Alone before the sides served up a match fitting for the occasion.

Liverpool went ahead after four minutes through John Aldridge, and held onto that lead until the final minute, when Everton substitute Stuart McCall equalised, and a pitch invasion by Everton fans ensued.

McCall’s goal was the last kick of the 90 minutes and the match went into extra time. On 95 minutes, Liverpool substitute Ian Rush scored with a half-volley on the turn to give Liverpool a 2–1 lead. Everton again equalised five minutes later when McCall again scored, chesting and volleying past Bruce Grobbelaar into the corner of the net. However, Rush – who had scored twice in Liverpool’s 3–1 win in the first Merseyside derby Final three years earlier – scored his second goal in the 104th minute with a header from a John Barnes cross and Liverpool would triumph once more.

30 Years Ago: Watford 0-2 Everton

The final of 1984 is remembered for Everton’s controversial second goal. After Graeme Sharp had put the Toffees ahead with a clinical finish late in the first half, Andy Gray seemed to head the ball out of the grasp of Watford keeper Steve Sherwood when he put Everton two up, but referee John Hunting allowed it to stand.

This victory ended a 14 year wait for silverware at Goodison Park and was the first trophy of the very successful Howard Kendall era. This was Watford’s only cup final appearance and Gray ensured that Elton John’s team left with the blues. 

 35 Years Ago: Arsenal 3-2 Manchester United

Terry Neill’s Arsenal held on to edge past Manchester United in what is widely regarded as one of the greatest-ever finishes to an FA Cup final. For over 85 minutes the game had been largely unremarkable, Arsenal having taken control with a 2–0 half time lead through goals from Brian Talbot and Frank Stapleton. In the 86th minute, however, Gordon McQueen scored following a set-piece, and two minutes later Sammy McIlroy dribbled past two Arsenal players to score a dramatic equaliser.

United’s celebrations proved short-lived however, as with the game poised for extra time Alan Sunderland scored a last-minute winner, making the final result Arsenal 3–2 Manchester United. This match is often referred to as the “Five-minute Final”.

THE ODDS – (Updated Jan 6th)

Man City  4/1,  Chelsea  9/2, Arsenal  9/2, Liverpool  11/2, Everton  8/1, Southampton  12/1, Swansea 25/1,  Sunderland  40/1, Stoke  40/1, Hull  40/1, Fulham  50/1, Palace  50/1, Forest 66/1, Norwich 66/1, Brighton  80/1, Bolton 80/1, Wigan  100/1, Ipswich  100/1

Odds courtesy of PaddyPower.